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Smuts

smut

1. Foul matter, like soot or coal dust; also, a spot or soil made by such matter.

2. (Science: chemical) bad, soft coal, containing much earthy matter, found in the immediate locality of faults.

3. (Science: botany) An affection of cereal grains producing a swelling which is at length resolved into a powdery sooty mass. It is caused by parasitic fungi of the genus ustilago. Ustilago segetum, or U. Carbo, is the commonest kind; that of indian corn is ustilago maydis.

4. Obscene language; ribaldry; obscenity. He does not stand upon decency . . . But will talk smut, though a priest and his mother be in the room. (Addison) Smut mill, a machine for cleansing grain from smut.

Origin: Akin to Sw. Smuts, Dan. Smuds, MHG. Smuz, G. Schmutz, D. Smet a spot or stain, smoddig, smodsig, smodderig, dirty, smodderen to smut; and probably to E. Smite. See Smite, and cf. Smitt, Smutch.


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... various types Fungi multicellular filamentous form with specialized eukaryotic cells absorb food funguses, molds, mushrooms, yeasts, mildews, and smuts Plantae multicellular form with specialized eukaryotic cells; do not have their own means of locomotion photosynthesize food mosses, ferns, woody ...

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by Dinkey
Tue Jun 23, 2009 10:27 am
 
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characteristics of the six kingdoms

... various types Fungi multicellular filamentous form with specialized eukaryotic cells absorb food funguses, molds, mushrooms, yeasts, mildews, and smuts Plantae multicellular form with specialized eukaryotic cells; do not have their own means of locomotion photosynthesize food mosses, ferns, woody ...

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by kiekyon
Sat Mar 04, 2006 9:27 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: characteristics of the six kingdoms
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