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Siren

siren

1. One of three sea nymphs, or, according to some writers, of two, said to frequent an island near the coast of Italy, and to sing with such sweetness that they lured mariners to destruction. Next where the sirens dwell you plow the seas; Their song is death, and makes destruction please. (pope)

2. An enticing, dangerous woman.

3. Something which is insidious or deceptive. Consumption is a siren. (W. Irving)

4. A mermaid.

5. (Science: zoology) Any long, slender amphibian of the genus Siren or family Sirenidae, destitute of hind legs and pelvis, and having permanent external gills as well as lungs. They inhabit the swamps, lagoons, and ditches of the southern united states. The more common species (Siren lacertina) is dull lead-gray in colour, and becames two feet long.

6. [F. Sirene, properly, a siren in sense 1.

(Science: physics) An instrument for producing musical tones and for ascertaining the number of sound waves or vibrations per second which produce a note of a given pitch. The sounds are produced by a perforated rotating disk or disks. A form with two disks operated by steam or highly compressed air is used sounding an alarm to vessels in fog.

Alternative forms: sirene, and syren.

Origin: L, fr. Gr., cf. F. Sirene.

Source: Webst 400 ers Dictionary


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Re: Experimental evidence for evolution

... do find Morriss’s take on this really amusing. “Yet, if evolution is glaringly obvious, why is it not only greeted with growing hostility, but the siren-call of anti-evolutionary dogma, notably ‘intelligent design’, remains a rallying point to individuals that in any other respect fail to manifest ...

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by jevg
Fri Jun 25, 2010 10:16 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Experimental evidence for evolution
Replies: 103
Views: 179685

Sonic reflexes

... its frequency only change with intensity I don't get this point, do you mean to say that the signal has a waveform? just like the intensity of the siren in a smoke detector is not related to the quantity of smoke. How would this explain the difference in pain perception with the difference in energy ...

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by ragav.payne
Wed Sep 27, 2006 2:01 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Sonic reflexes
Replies: 21
Views: 11819

Sonic reflexes

... its frequency only change with intensity) and do not dissipate any of the energy acquired by the nerve receptor. just like the intensity of the siren in a smoke detector is not related to the quantity of smoke. No Peltier effect through your nerves... ANd if you use a big enough energy source ...

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by canalon
Mon Sep 25, 2006 11:47 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Sonic reflexes
Replies: 21
Views: 11819


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