Shoe

shoe

Origin: OE. Sho, scho, AS. Sch, sceoh; akin to OFries. Sk, OS. Skh, D. Schoe, schoen, G. Schuh, OHG. Scuoh, Icel. Skr, Dan. & Sw. Sko, Goth. Skhs; of unknown origin.

1. A covering for the human foot, usually made of leather, having a thick and somewhat stiff sole and a lighter top. It differs from a boot on not extending so far up the leg. Your hose should be ungartered, . . . Yourshoe untied. (Shak) Spare none but such as go in clouted shoon. (Shak)

2. Anything resembling a shoe in form, position, or use. Specifically: A plate or rim of iron nailed to the hoof of an animal to defend it from injury.

A band of iron or steel, or a ship of wood, fastened to the bottom of the runner of a sleigh, or any vehicle which slides on the snow.

A drag, or sliding piece of wood or iron, placed under the wheel of a loaded vehicle, to retard its motion in going down a hill.

The part of a railroad car brake which presses upon the wheel to retard its motion.

A plate, or notched piece, interposed between a moving part and the stationary part on which it bears, to take the wear and afford means of adjustment; called also slipper, and gib.

Shoe is often used adjectively, or in composition; as, shoe buckle, or shoe- 70d buckle; shoe latchet, or shoe-latchet; shoe leathet, or shoe-leather; shoe string, shoe-string, or shoestring. Shoe of an anchor.

A block with two sheaves, one above the other, and at right angles to each other. Shoe bolt, a bolt with a flaring head, for fastening shoes on sleigh runners. Shoe pac, a kind of moccasin. See Pac. Shoe stone, a sharpening stone used by shoemakers and other workers in leather.


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