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Shafts

shaft

1. The slender, smooth stem of an arrow; hence, an arrow. His sleep, his meat, his drink, is him bereft, That lean he wax, and dry as is a shaft. (Chaucer) A shaft hath three principal parts, the stele [stale], the feathers, and the head. (Ascham)

2. The long handle of a spear or similar weapon; hence, the weapon itself; anything regarded as a shaft to be thrown or darted; as, shafts of light. And the thunder, winged with red lightning and impetuous rage, perhaps hath spent his shafts. (milton) Some kinds of literary pursuits . . . Have been attacked with all the shafts of ridicule. (V. Knox)

3. That which resembles in some degree the stem or handle of an arrow or a spear; a long, slender part, especially when cylindrical.

(Science: botany) Specifically: (a) The stem or midrib of a feather. The pole, or tongue, of a vehicle; also, a thill.

The part of a candlestick which supports its branches. Thou shalt make a candlestick of pure gold . . . His shaft, and his branches, his bowls, his knops, and his flowers, shall be of the same. (Ex. Xxv. 31)

The handle or helve of certain tools, instruments, etc, as a hammer, a whip, etc.

A pole, especially a Maypole.

The body of a column; the cylindrical pillar between the capital and base. Also, the [[ f46 part]] of a chimney above the roof. Also, the spire of a steeple.

A column, an obelisk, or other spire-shaped or columnar monument. Bid time and nature gently spare The shaft we raise to thee.

(Science: machinery) (Emerson) A solid or hollow cylinder or bar, having one or more journals on which it rests and revolves, and intended to carry one or more wheels or other revolving parts and to transmit power or motion; as, the shaft of a steam engine.

4. (Science: zoology) A humming bird (Thaumastura cora) having two of the tail feathers next to the middle ones very long in the male; called also cora humming bird.

5. [Cf. G. Schacht.

(Science: chemical) A well-like excavation in the earth, perpendicular or nearly so, made for reaching and raising ore, for raising water, etc.

6. A long passage for the admission or outlet of air; an air shaft.

7. The chamber of a blast furnace. Line shaft, a furnace, in the form of a chimney, which is charged at the top and tapped at the bottom.

Origin: OE. Shaft, schaft, AS. Sceaft; akin to D. Schacht, OHG. Scaft, G. Schaft, Dan. & Sw. Skaft handle, haft, Icel. Skapt, and probably to L. Scapus, Gr, a staff. Probably originally, a shaven or smoothed rod. Cf. Scape, Scepter, Shave.


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Hair that moves

... shaft problem is light microscopy. Therapy of hair shaft disorders should focus to the cause. In addition, minimizing traumatic influences to hair shafts, such as dry hair with an electric dryer, permanent waves and dyes is important. A short hair style is more suitable for such patients with hair ...

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Wed Apr 11, 2012 3:05 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: fiber/hair moving thru water
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Views: 14778

The Fiber Disease

... the steel whiskers came up from Mexico and jumped into my skin and acted like hair? or could you tell me how the Japenese Fungi invaded my hair shafts? Thanks if you can tell me.....your theories are so spot onish

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by London
Sat Dec 02, 2006 7:05 pm
 
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The Fiber Disease

... known as Trichosporon cutaneum, as it is the etiologic agent of "white piedra," a mild superficial infection of head and pubic hair shafts, most often seen in tropical climates and rarely in temperate areas (1,2). It is widely distributed in the soil of many climates; and it is occasionally ...

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by Skytroll
Thu Jul 20, 2006 8:11 pm
 
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The Fiber Disease

... to so many systems in our body. That is why I believe almost all anatomy systems are involved. Even fluids in our body, pores seem involved, hair shafts, muscles, nerves, joints, but, especially sensor cells. We feel movement, we feel spikes, we feel stabs, we even feel liquid moving. The sensory ...

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by Skytroll
Thu Apr 13, 2006 7:28 pm
 
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Dinosaur Confusion

At some point the shafts of these structures needed to become hollow as well, adding a little more structural complexity. When looking at archeopteryx and other fossils, don't just look at the feather imprints, look at the structure ...

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by AstusAleator
Fri Mar 03, 2006 11:16 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Dinosaur Confusion
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