Seam

seam

Origin: OE. Seem, seam, AS. Seam; akin to D. Zoom, OHG. Soum, G. Saum, LG. Soom, Icel. Saumr, Sw. & Dan. Som, and E. Sew.

See sew to fasten with thread.

1. The fold or line formed by sewing together two pieces of cloth or leather.

2. Hence, a line of junction; a joint; a suture, as on a ship, a floor, or other structure; the line of union, or joint, of two boards, planks, metal plates, etc. Precepts should be so finely wrought together . . . That no coarse seam may discover where they join. (Addison)

3. (Science: geology) A thin layer or stratum; a narrow vein between two thicker strata; as, a seam of coal.

4. A line or depression left by a cut or wound; a scar; a cicatrix. Seam blast, a blast by putting the powder into seams or cracks of rocks. Seam lace, a lace used by carriage makers to cover seams and edges.

Synonym: seaming lace. Seam presser.

(Science: agriculture) A heavy roller to press down newly plowed furrows. A tailor's sadiron for pressing seams. Seam set, a set for flattering the seams of metal sheets, leather work, etc.

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