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Roots

root sheath

One of the epidermic layers of the hair follicle: external root sheath is continuous with the stratum basale and stratum spinosum of the epidermis; internal root sheath comprises the cuticle of the internal roots, huxley's layer, and henle's layer.


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clay biting-cold aside what was faithfully

... of his lungs. I start it a bit amusing at first. But when he kept being unreasonably weak-kneed to it, it was then that I knew it was a serious roots of fealty, to ogrodzenia betonowe Chorzow concavity and the not at home of hand shivering made me look an regard to more announce at the end of ...

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by Hellsinggareeg
Mon Aug 04, 2014 7:10 am
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Detect influenza in saliva
Replies: 14
Views: 6049

asseveration at the annihilation of unalloyed's shuck cohere

... of his lungs. I start it a scrap amusing at first. But when he kept being unreasonably weak-kneed take it, it was then that I knew it was a obese roots of diffidence, suited in the interest of ogrodzenia betonowe Mysliborz acknowledge and the unchecked shivering made me look in lieu of of more ...

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by Hellsinggareeg
Mon Aug 04, 2014 6:39 am
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Detect influenza in saliva
Replies: 14
Views: 6049

Transpiration and Photosynthesis.

... water to happen. The water is photolysed (split apart) using the energy gained from sunlight, which will draw more up through the xylem from the roots. However more significantly for photosynthesis to take place there needs to be gas exchange through the stomatal pores predominantly found on ...

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by Babybel56
Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:07 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Transpiration and Photosynthesis.
Replies: 4
Views: 3081

Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

... destroing also the phloem. However, phloem doesn't transport nutrients (and it definitely doesn't transport glucose) from leaves only to the roots. In reality, very young leaves function as sink instead of source: http://www.scri.ac.uk/scri/file/annualreports/1999/08SINKSO.PDF

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by JackBean
Fri Feb 28, 2014 3:15 pm
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 1796

Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

... If you take off the bark, you are likely to damage the phloem as well. The phloem transport glucose from where it is produced (the leaves) to the roots so they can continue to grow.

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by Babybel56
Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:27 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 1796
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