Riboflavin

Definition

noun

One of the B vitamins that is involved in energy production for the electron transport chain, citric acid cycle, and catabolism of fatty acids, and present in liver, eggs, dark green vegetables, legumes, whole and enriched grain products, and milk


Supplement

Riboflavin is one of the B vitamins. It is yellow-orange in colour and known for imparting its colour to vitamin supplements. Its active forms include flavin mononucleotide and Flavin adenine dinucleotide in which both are cofactors in various flavoprotein enzyme reactions. The main function of riboflavin is to help release energy from food. It is involved in the energy production for the electron transport chain, in the citric acid cycle, and in the catabolism of fatty acids.1

The major food sources of riboflavin are liver, eggs, dark green vegetables, legumes, whole and enriched grain products, and milk. The recommended diatery allowance for this vitamin is 1.3 mg a day for adult males and 1.1 mg daily for adult females.2 Riboflavin deficiency causes ariboflavinosis characterized by stomatitis and angular stomatitis. There are no known harmful effects of riboflavin overdose.


Word origin: "ribose" (sugar component) + "flavin" (the ring-moiety, from Latin flavus, meaning yellow)

IUPAC name: 7,8-Dimethyl-10-[(2S,3S,4R)-2,3,4,5-tetrahydroxypentyl]benzo[g]pteridine-2,4-dione

Chemical formula: C17H20N4O6

Also called:

See also:

Reference(s):
1 "Riboflavin". Alternative Medicine Review 13 (4): 334–340. 2008.
2 Bellows, L. and Moore, R. (2012). Water-Soluble Vitamins: B-Complex and Vitamin C. Retrieved from [[1]]

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