Rear

rear

1. To raise; to lift up; to cause to rise, become erect, etc.; to elevate; as, to rear a monolith. In adoration at his feet I fell Submiss; he reared me. (milton) It reareth our hearts from vain thoughts. (barrow) Mine [shall be] the first hand to rear her banner. (ld. Lytton)

2. To erect by building; to set up; to construct; as, to rear defenses or houses; to rear one government on the ruins of another. One reared a font of stone. (Tennyson)

3. To lift and take up. And having her from Trompart lightly reared, Upon his set the lovely load. (Spenser)

4. To bring up to maturity, as young; to educate; to instruct; to foster; as, to rear offspring. He wants a father to protect his youth, And rear him up to virtue. (southern)

5. To breed and raise; as, to rear cattle.

6. To rouse; to strip up. And seeks the tusky boar to rear. (Dryden)

Synonym: To lift, elevate, erect, raise, build, establish. See the note under Raise, 3 .

Origin: AS. Raeran to raise, rear, elevate, for raesan, causative of risan to rise. See Rise, and cf. Raise.

being behind, or in the hindmost part; hindmost; as, the rear rank of a company. Rear admiral, an officer in the navy, next in rank below a vice admiral, and above a commodore. See Admiral. Rear front, the sight nearest the breech. To bring up the rear, to come [[last 401 ]] or behind.


Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



This page was last modified on 3 October 2005, at 21:16. This page has been accessed 4,186 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link