Proteome

Definition

noun, plural: proteomes

The complete set of proteins in an organism over its entire life cycle, or at a given time under defined environmental conditions


Supplement

Marc Wilkins, an Australian scientist, coined the term proteome in 1994 during a symposium in Siena, Italy.1 The term is a blend of the words protein and genome. Proteins are polymers of amino acids and are synthesized as specified in the genetic code. Genome pertains to the complete set of genetic material in an organism. The genome of eukaryotes is contained in a single, haploid set of chromosomes. The genome of bacteria is contained in a single chromosome whereas the genome of viruses is in the DNA or RNA. Thus, proteome refers to the complete set of proteins as expressed by a genome in a particular cell or organism in its entire life cycle, or at a given time under defined environmental conditions. Wilkins used the term to describe all complement of expressed protein in a cell, tissue, or organism. The study of proteomes is called proteomics.


See also:

Reference(s):
1 Wilkins, M. (Dec 2009). "Proteomics data mining". Expert review of proteomics (England) 6 (6): 599–603.

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