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Produce

produce

1. To bring forward; to lead forth; to offer to view or notice; to exhibit; to show; as, to produce a witness or evidence in court. Produce your cause, saith the lord. (isa. Xli. 21) Your parents did not produce you much into the world. (swift)

2. To bring forth, as young, or as a natural product or growth; to give birth to; to bear; to generate; to propagate; to yield; to furnish; as, the earth produces grass; trees produce fruit; the clouds produce rain. This soil produces all sorts of palm trees. (Sandys) [They] produce prodigious births of body or mind. (milton) The greatest jurist his country had produced. (Macaulay)

3. To cause to be or to happen; to originate, as an effect or result; to bring about; as, disease produces pain; vice produces misery.

4. To give being or form to; to manufacture; to make; as, a manufacturer produces excellent wares.

5. To yield or furnish; to gain; as, money at interest produces an income; capital produces profit.

6. To draw out; to extend; to lengthen; to prolong; as, to produce a man's life to threescore.

7. (Science: geometry) To extend; applied to a line, surface, or solid; as, to produce a side of a triangle.

Origin: L. Producere, productum, to bring forward, beget, produce; pro forward, forth _ ducere 403

to lead. See Duke.

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