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Primary productivity

Primary productivity

(Botany) - the rate at which biomass is produced by organisms which converts inorganic substrates into complex organic substances. Primary production typically occurs through photosynthesis; when green plants convert solar energy, carbon dioxide, and water to glucose, and eventually to plant tissue. It also refers to the rate at which some organisms like bacteria that thrive in the deep sea convert chemical Energy to biomass through chemosynthesis.


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The Fiber Disease

... the nature of life in the universe and to assure crew health and productivity for increasing periods of time and at increasing distances beyond Earth. NASA's primary interests are in functional genomics of extreme environments, including the space ...

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by Skytroll
Sun Sep 17, 2006 5:19 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The Fiber Disease
Replies: 7403
Views: 5409606

The Fiber Disease

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by Skytroll
Sun Aug 20, 2006 3:56 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The Fiber Disease
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The Fiber Disease

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by London
Fri Feb 03, 2006 6:26 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The Fiber Disease
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Views: 5409606


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