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Pound

pound

1. An inclosure, maintained by public authority, in which cattle or other animals are confined when taken in trespassing, or when going at large in violation of law; a pinfold.

2. A level stretch in a canal between locks.

3. A kind of net, having a large inclosure with a narrow entrance into which fish are directed by wings spreading outward. Pound covert, a pound that is close or covered over, as a shed. Pound overt, a pound that is open overhead.

Origin: AS. Pund an inclosure: cf. Forpyndan to turn away, or to repress, also Icel. Pynda to extort, torment, Ir. Pont, pond, pound. Cf. Pinder, Pinfold, Pin to inclose, Pond.

Origin: AS. Pund, fr. L. Pondo, akin to pondus a weight, pendere top weigh. See Pendant.

1. A certain specified weight; especially, a legal standard consisting of an established number of ounces.

The pound in general use in the united states and in England is the pound avoirdupois, which is divided into sixteen ounces, and contains 7,000 grains. The pound troy is divided into twelve ounces, and contains 5,760 grains. 144 pounds avoirdupois are equal to 175 pounds troy weight. See Avoirdupois, and Troy.

2. A British denomination of money of account, equivalent to twenty shillings sterling, and equal in value to about $4.86. There is no coin known by this name, but the gold sovereign is of the same value.

The pound sterling was in saxon times, about A. D. 671, a pound troy of silver, and a shilling was its twentieth part; consequently the latter was three times as large as it is at present.


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Re: Can you gain more weight than the food you ate weighs?

"35 calories is equal to 1 pound". It depends on the food item, your metabolic rate and other factors.

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by jasonroy
Wed Nov 23, 2011 4:56 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Can you gain more weight than the food you ate weighs?
Replies: 13
Views: 29496

Can you gain more weight than the food you ate weighs?

I've never seen the 3500 calorie number but I would guess that it's from some diet book or diet guru. That number does seem low for gaining one pound but like others said it all depends on what the actual food was. There are a lot of factors that go into how many calories you burn, energy you ...

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by ReginaM
Mon Oct 24, 2011 8:37 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Can you gain more weight than the food you ate weighs?
Replies: 13
Views: 29496

Re: Why do we need to eat so much protein? A.a. can be reused

... of protein that should be the daily minimum. According to this method, a person weighing 150 lbs. should eat 55 grams of protein per day, a 200-pound person should get 74 grams, and a 250-pound person should eat 92 grams.

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by Falko
Thu Aug 11, 2011 12:53 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Why do we need to eat so much protein? A.a. can be reused
Replies: 5
Views: 4402

Re: Can you gain more weight than the food you ate weighs?

... (and some small measure of nitrogen) that becomes chemically altered into body mass. What chemical scenario, at the molecular level, might turn a pound of food solids, a pound of oxygen, a 1/16 pound of hydrogen (much of the last two from the water in beer in my case), and a smidge of nitrogen, ...

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by BuzzMega
Sat Apr 23, 2011 4:28 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Can you gain more weight than the food you ate weighs?
Replies: 13
Views: 29496

Re: Stomach bloating and weight gain

... issues with it, and learn to eat smaller amounts of it less often. When my daughter came to me with her issues, I told her the same. She gained 15 pound in only a couple months and her bra size went up 2 sizes. She was tested for pregnancy, along a few other things, and still no explanation. After ...

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by Jacquie18
Sat Jul 24, 2010 9:25 pm
 
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Stomach bloating and weight gain
Replies: 453
Views: 2733015
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