Plasma B cell

Definition

noun, plural: plasma B cells

A large B lymphocyte exposed to antigen, produce, and secrete large amounts of antibodies for opsonisation and the destruction of microbes


Supplement

B lymphocytes are types of lymphocytes involved in the production of immunoglobulins, thus, in the humoral immune response of the adaptive immune system. There are many types of B lymphocytes (or B cells). One of them is the plasma B cells (or simply plasma cell). Others are memory B cells, B-1 cells, B-2 cells, marginal-zone B cells, follicular B cells, and regulatory B cells.

Plasma B cells come from the bone marrow. In the bone marrow, B cells are produced and differentiate into plasma B cells generally in the lymph nodes. Plasma B cells secrete large volumes of antibodies. They are transported through the blood plasma and the lymphatic system. Because of the large volume of antibodies that they produce, they are sometimes called antibody factories. They have large amounts of rough endoplasmic reticulum in their cytoplasm. These organelles are essentially for the production of antibodies. The antibodies they produce are involved in opsonisatio, which enhances phagocytosis and the eventual destruction of the microbe.


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