1. A bundle made up and prepared to be carried; especially, a bundle to be carried on the back; a load for an animal; a bale, as of goods.

2. [Cf. Peck] A number or quantity equal to the contents of a pack; hence, a multitude; a burden. A pack of sorrows. A pack of blessings.

In England, by a pack of meal is meant 280 lbs.; of wool, 240 lbs.

3. A number or quantity of connected or similar things; as: A full set of playing cards; also, the assortment used in a particular game; as, a euchre pack.

A number of hounds or dogs, hunting or kept together.

A number of persons associated or leagued in a bad design or practice; a gang; as, a pack of thieves or knaves.

A shook of cask staves.

A bundle of sheet-iron plates for rolling simultaneously.

4. A large area of floating pieces of ice driven together more or less closely.

5. An envelope, or wrapping, of sheets used in hydropathic practice, called dry pack, wet pack, cold pack, etc, according to the method of treatment.

6. [Prob. The same word; but cf. AS. Pcan to deceive] A loose, lewd, or worthless person. See baggage. Pack animal, an animal, as a horse, mule, etc, employed in carrying packs. Pack cloth, a coa 1000 rse cloth, often duck, used in covering packs or bales. Pack horse. See Pack animal (above). Pack ice. See def. 4, above. Pack moth, a troop of pack animals.

Origin: Akin to D. Pak, G. Pack, Dan. Pakke, Sw. Packa, Icel. Pakki, Gael. & Ir. Pac, Arm. Pak. Cf. Packet.

1. To make a pack of; to arrange closely and securely in a pack; hence, to place and arrange compactly as in a pack; to press into close order or narrow compass; as to pack goods in a box; to pack fish. Strange materials packed up with wonderful art. (Addison) Where . . . The bones Of all my buried ancestors are packed. (Shak)

2. To fill in the manner of a pack, that is, compactly and securely, as for transportation; hence, to fill closely or to repletion; to stow away within; to cause to be full; to crowd into; as, to pack a trunk; the play, or the audience, packs the theater.

3. To sort and arrange (the cards) in a pack so as to secure the game unfairly. And mighty dukes pack cards for half a crown. (pope)

4. Hence: To bring together or make up unfairly and fraudulently, in order to secure a certain result; as, to pack a jury or a causes. The expected council was dwindling into . . . A packed assembly of Italian bishops. (Atterbury)

5. To contrive unfairly or fraudulently; to plot. He lost life . . . Upon a nice point subtilely devised and packed by his enemies. (Fuller)

6. To load with a pack; hence, to load; to encumber; as, to pack a horse. Our thighs packed with wax, our mouths with honey. (Shack)

7. To cause to go; to send away with baggage or belongings; especially, to send away peremptorily or suddenly; sometimes with off; as, to pack a boy off to school. He . . . Must not die Till George be packed with post horse up to heaven. (Shak)

8. To transport in a pack, or in the manner of a pack (i. E, on the backs of men or beasts).

9. To envelop in a wet or dry sheet, within numerous coverings. See Pack.

10. (Science: mechanics) To render impervious, as by filling or surrounding with suitable material, or to fit or adjust so as to move without giving passage to air, water, or steam; as, to pack a joint; to pack the piston of a steam engine.

Origin: Akin to D. Pakken, G. Packen, Dan. Pakke, Sw. Packa, Icel. Pakka. See Pack.

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