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Mrna

Definition

noun

Abbreviated form for messenger ribonucleic acid, the type of RNA that codes for the chemical blueprint for a protein (during protein synthesis).


Supplement

In prokaryotes, mRNA is derived from a large primary transcript from a DNA sequence. The mRNAs of prokaryotes are usually very short lived (from seconds to more than an hour) and protein synthesis starts even while the mRNA is still being synthesized. The resulting mRNA is essentially mature upon transcription and requires no extensive processing.

In eukaryotes, the mRNA is produced in the nucleus (during transcription). This mRNA needs to be processed extensively to become mature. This extensive processing includes the addition of a 5' cap at the 5' end and a sequence of adenylate groups at the 3' end, the poly a tail, as well as the removal of any introns and the splicing together of exons. When the pre-mRNA has been completely processed, it is now called a mature mRNA, which will then be transported for translation into the cytoplasm through the nuclear pore. The eukaryotic mRNA has relatively longer lifespan, e.g. mammalian mRNA can live from several minutes to days.


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translation from DNA

What jonmoulton wrote is true (regulation on RNA level), but further there is amplification of the signal (there can be thousands copies of each mRNA, each giving rise to hundreds of protein molecules), also, during replication of DNA the protein synthesis would have to be shut down and there ...

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by JackBean
Tue Sep 30, 2014 8:16 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: translation from DNA
Replies: 2
Views: 226

Re: translation from DNA

... that much of the regulation of gene expression occurs at the RNA level, with variations in the stability of RNA, translational repression by mRNA, inhibition by natural antisense transcripts, etc. Perhaps the RNA intermediate was required in early life to provide a mechanism for regulation ...

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by jonmoulton
Mon Sep 29, 2014 3:03 pm
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: translation from DNA
Replies: 2
Views: 226

Re: Any ideas for vaccine development or anti-viral drugs???

... EBOV infection using antisense phosphorodiamidate morpholino oligomers (PMOs). A combination of EBOV-specific PMOs targeting sequences of viral mRNAs for the viral proteins (VPs) VP24, VP35, and RNA polymerase L protected rodents in both pre- and post-exposure therapeutic regimens. In a prophylactic ...

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by jonmoulton
Mon Sep 15, 2014 3:04 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Any ideas for vaccine development or anti-viral drugs???
Replies: 2
Views: 478

mRNA vs. cell reporter assay

... interpretation of the GTP signal. if you are looking for downregulation of transcription, it takes a while for preexisting GPR to degrade but the mRNA signal is likely to disappear fairly rapidly once transcription stops. For upregulation, mRNA will reach steady-state fairly rapidly but there ...

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by jonmoulton
Mon Sep 08, 2014 5:27 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: mRNA vs. cell reporter assay
Replies: 2
Views: 693

Re: Totipotent Stem Cell From Molecular Components

... for a particular protein in my stem cell at least, the amount of that particular protein is the average of the gene expression in # of strands of mRNA * 100. I am getting the protein this way. I take the results of PCR and put it in a test tube with RNA polymerases, Ribosomes, and other proteins ...

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by caters
Fri Aug 01, 2014 1:42 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Totipotent Stem Cell From Molecular Components
Replies: 2
Views: 3334
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