Monocular vision



(1) (zoology) A type of vision in which one eye of the animal moves and sees objects independently of the other eye (as opposed to binocular vision wherein both eyes of the animal are used together)

(2) A condition wherein only one eye is capable of vision


In zoology, a monocular vision is a type of vision found mainly in animals with eyes placed on opposite sides of their head, such as fish, rabbits, and birds of prey.

Most preys have monocular vision. It enables them to respond more quickly upon visually sensing a threat, such as seeing a predator. Monocular vision enables animals to see more than one plane of vision since their eyes works separately. As a result, they can see different objects at the same time. However, depth perception in monocular vision is restricted. Thus, animals with monocular vision are much less efficient at perceiving depth or relative distances between objects than those with binocular vision.

Word origin: Greek mono (one) + Latin oculus (eye)


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