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Maternal age 35 and over

Maternal age 35 and over

pregnancy in women 35 or more years of age. It is used for normal pregnancies and for problems of pregnancy occurring in a woman's late reproductive years. These include effects on the mothers physical and mental health as well as risks of perinatal mortality and foetal abnormality.


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Re: Chromatin

Before replication there were 23 pairs of molecules, 23 of maternal origin and 23 of paternal origin, plus the maternally-contributed mitochondrial chromosome (which I'll ignore for the rest of this post). Counting chromosomal centromeres, there are 46 ...

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by jonmoulton
Thu Sep 04, 2014 3:04 pm
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: Chromatin
Replies: 2
Views: 923

Gene knockdowns in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis

... Rosenberg MI, Brent AE, Payre F, Desplan C. eLife. 2014;3:e01440 doi:10.7554/eLife.01440 "Although parental RNAi in Nasonia is effective for maternal and early zygotic genes ..., it often does not provide significant knockdown of later-acting genes. To overcome this limitation, we designed ...

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by jonmoulton
Fri Mar 07, 2014 5:57 pm
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Gene knockdowns in the wasp Nasonia vitripennis
Replies: 0
Views: 1168

Turner Syndrome and X chromosomes

Hi, I have a question. My university biology professor told us that one X chromosome in women is always bundled up, and we have some cells with the maternal x chromosome bunched up, and the others have the paternal x chromosome bunched up. Essentially, only one is in use at any given time, right? ...

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by ofekistit
Sun Nov 17, 2013 3:33 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Turner Syndrome and X chromosomes
Replies: 1
Views: 966

Re: What causes dominance between alleles?

... When you have two healthy alleles for a particular gene, one copy on a maternal and one on the corresponding paternal chromosome (and excluding ... can result. This would be a case of the healthy allele being dominant over the recessive defective allele. Maternal - defective protein Paternal ...

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by jonmoulton
Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:45 pm
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: What causes dominance between alleles?
Replies: 2
Views: 3215

X chromosome inactivation

... not considered as "X chromosome inactivation". In mammals, X chromosome inactivation is random and can happen on the paternal or on the maternal X chromosome. hope it helps!

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by cathbr
Thu Jul 18, 2013 3:56 pm
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: X chromosome inactivation
Replies: 1
Views: 1620
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