Lymphoid tissue

Lymphoid tissue

(Science: anatomy) tissue that is particularly rich in lymphocytes (and accessory cells such as macrophages and reticular cells), particularly the lymph nodes, spleen, thymus, Peyer's patches, pharyngeal tonsils, adenoids and (in birds) the bursa of Fabricius.

Central lymphoid tissue: a term occasionally used as synonym for primary lymphoid tissue but should be avoided to prevent confusion between anatomical location, which is irrelevant and centrality in the system.

peripheral lymphoid tissue: secondary lymphoid tissue, not necessarily located peripherally.

primary lymphoid tissue: lymphoid tissues in which immune cells develop as opposed to the secondary or peripheral lymphoid tissues in which antigen independent or antigen dependent stages of maturation take place and in which responsive lymphocytes are found. Primary lymphoid tissues are foetal liver, adult bone marrow and thymus (and bursa of Fabricius in birds). Secondary tissues are lymph nodes, spleen, tonsils and mucosa associated lymphoid tissue.


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