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Long

Long

1. Drawn out in a line, or in the direction of length; protracted; extended; as, a long line; opposed to short, and distinguished from broad or wide.

2. Drawn out or extended in time; continued through a considerable tine, or to a great length; as, a long series of events; a long debate; a long drama; a long history; a long book.

3. Slow in passing; causing weariness by length or duration; lingering; as, long hours of watching.

4. Occurring or coming after an extended interval; distant in time; far away. The we may us reserve both fresh and strong Against the tournament, which is not long. (Spenser)

5. Extended to any specified measure; of a specified length; as, a span long; a yard long; a mile long, that is, extended to the measure of a mile, etc.

6. Far-reaching; extensive. long views.

7. Prolonged, or relatively more prolonged, in utterance; said of vowels and syllables. See short, 13, and guide to Pronunciation, 22.

long is used as a prefix in a large number of compound adjectives which are mostly of obvious meaning; as, long-armed, long-beaked, long-haired, long-horned, long-necked, long-sleeved, long-tailed, long- worded, etc. In the long run, in the whole course of things taken together; in the ultimate result; eventually. Long clam, to hold stock for a rise in price, or to have a contract under which one can demand stock on or before a certain day at a stipulated price; opposed to short in such phrases as, to be short of stock, to sell short, etc. See short. To have a long head, to have a farseeing or sagacious mind.

Origin: as. Long, lang; akin to os, OFries, D, & g. Lang, Icel. Langr, Sw. Lang, dan. Lang, goth. Laggs, L.longus. Cf. Length, ling a fish, Linger, Lunge, Purloin.

1. To a great extent in apace; as, a long drawn out line.

2. To a great extent in time; during a long time. They that tarry long at the wine. (Prov. Xxiii. 30) When the trumpet soundeth long. (ex. Xix. 13)

3. at a point of duration far distant, either prior or posterior; as, not long before; not long after; long before the foundation of Rome; long after the Conquest.

4. Through the whole extent or duration. The bird of dawning singeth all night long. (Shak)

5. Through an extent of time, more or less; only in question; as, how long will you be gone?

Origin: as. Lance.


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