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Law of Dominance

Definition

noun

(genetics) A Mendelian law which holds that one from the pair of alleles coding for a particular trait would be expressed whereas the other is unexpressed. The allele expressed for a particular trait is regarded as the dominant whereas the other (which is unexpressed) is considered recessive.


Supplement

For instance, a cross between two pure plant breeds for a flower trait of contrasting colors (e.g. blue and white) would result in a progeny (offspring) that bears the two alleles (each inherited from its parents) coding for the blue and white flowers. However, this progeny would produce either blue or white flower. If for instance the dominant color for the flower is blue, then, the allele coding for blue flowers would be expressed whereas the allele for white flowers would not be expressed. In this case, the recessive trait (i.e. white flower) would only be expressed in a progeny when it acquires a pair of recessive alleles from its parents.


Compare (with other Gregor Mendel's laws on inheritance):


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Re: Multicellular prokaryote

... units, either maintain more distinct separateness than fits our 'notion (ex colonies), ' or lose their distinction too much (no one organism has dominance which emerges as a separate reproducible entity). The lack of nucleus/membranous abilities/meiosis, makes it difficult to keep that ''separateness" ...

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by thirdprometheus
Fri Nov 15, 2013 7:45 pm
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Multicellular prokaryote
Replies: 27
Views: 27980

Re:

Hi guys thanks for ur replies! I think one of the reasons for dominance in traits is that d dominant gene tends to inhibit the expression of the recessive gene either directly or through a corporative protein. What do you mean by "inhibit the expression ...

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by wildfunguy
Thu Aug 22, 2013 6:33 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Do chromosomses ever get competitive?
Replies: 9
Views: 7385

Do chromosomses ever get competitive?

Hi guys thanks for ur replies! I think one of the reasons for dominance in traits is that d dominant gene tends to inhibit the expression of the recessive gene either directly or through a corporative protein.

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by Fearnot
Fri Aug 16, 2013 5:31 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Do chromosomses ever get competitive?
Replies: 9
Views: 7385

Re: What causes dominance between alleles?

This is not the only way that dominance and recessiveness can happen. But this is a good way to illustrate once possibility (and a fairly common one). When you have two healthy alleles for a particular gene, one copy on a maternal and one ...

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by jonmoulton
Fri Aug 09, 2013 7:45 pm
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: What causes dominance between alleles?
Replies: 2
Views: 3193

What causes dominance between alleles?

In alleles, what makes one dominant and the other recessive? Why is the transcription of the chromosome that carries the dominant gene preferrable to the one that carries the recessive gene?

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by Fearnot
Fri Aug 09, 2013 4:22 pm
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: What causes dominance between alleles?
Replies: 2
Views: 3193
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