Langhans giant cell

Definition

noun, plural: Langhans giant cells

A type of giant cell formed by the fusion of epithelioid macrophages, and characterized by nuclei that are arranged similar to a horseshoe and are located peripherally


Supplement

Langhans giant cells as the name implies are cells that are exceptionally large. They also have multiple nuclei. The nuclei of Langhans giant cell are located in the cell periphery. The nuclei are also arranged in a way that they resemble a horseshoe, which make them distinct from other giant cells such as Touton giant cells in which the nuclei are grouped forming a ring. Langhans giant cells derived their name after Theodor Langhans, a German pathologist.1

Langhans giant cells are formed similarly by the fusion of epitheliod cells (macrophages) just as the other types of giant cells. The fusion of these cells resulted in a large cell having multiple nuclei.

Langhans giant cells are often associated with tubercular lesions. They are also seen in certain types of granulomatous diseases. They are also related to syphilis, sarcoidosis and deep fungal infections.


Also called:

See also:


Reference(s):
1 Pritchard, J., Foley, P., & Wong, H. (September 2003). "Langerhans and Langhans: what's misleading in a name?". Lancet 362 (9387): 922.

Retrieved from "http://www.biology-online.org/bodict/index.php?title=Langhans_giant_cell&oldid=101055"
First | Previous (Langhans cells) | Next (Langhans giant cells) | Last
Advertisement
Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page.