Dictionary » I » Isometric

Isometric

Isometric

1. Of equal dimensions.

2. In physiology, denoting the condition when the ends of a contracting muscle are held fixed so that contraction produces increased tension at a constant overall length.

Compare: auxotonic, isotonic, isovolumic.

Origin: iso-_ g. Metron, measure


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Re:

... the joint and also prevents you from exceeding the natural range of motion of the joint and damaging the joint and/or ligaments. In some cases of isometric muscle work (the muscle length does not change), for example when you try to firmly fix your arm into certain position without external force ...

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by mido95
Fri Dec 09, 2011 10:47 am
 
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Muscles anatomy question ?
Replies: 3
Views: 3602

Muscles anatomy question ?

... the joint and also prevents you from exceeding the natural range of motion of the joint and damaging the joint and/or ligaments. In some cases of isometric muscle work (the muscle length does not change), for example when you try to firmly fix your arm into certain position without external force ...

See entire post
by biohazard
Fri Dec 09, 2011 7:57 am
 
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Muscles anatomy question ?
Replies: 3
Views: 3602

Re: Muscle Tension

It should be isometric. Isotonic muscle contraction remain constant provided that the weight of the object you lift remains the same. While isometric contraction is characterize as contractions base on the sheer force and weight ...

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by DocWillow
Thu Nov 24, 2011 11:53 am
 
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Muscle Tension
Replies: 9
Views: 11806

Re:

... contractions, a fixed resistance may not provide a sufficient workload over the complete range of motion to provide the maximum training benefits. Isometric contraction is usually done when the joint or position of the limb is held in a fixed angular position. The muscle develops tension but there ...

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by dorapatton1
Fri Nov 11, 2011 3:05 am
 
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Muscle Tension
Replies: 9
Views: 11806

Re:

... contractions, a fixed resistance may not provide a sufficient workload over the complete range of motion to provide the maximum training benefits. Isometric contraction is usually done when the joint or position of the limb is held in a fixed angular position. The muscle develops tension but there ...

See entire post
by bradly
Sat Nov 05, 2011 3:57 pm
 
Forum: Physiology
Topic: Muscle Tension
Replies: 9
Views: 11806
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