Interspecific competition

Definition

noun

(ecology) A form of competition between different species inhabiting the same ecological area


Supplement

In biology, competition refers to the symbiotic interaction between or among living things for limited resources. These resources may be in the form of territory, goods, food (prey), mates, etc. Competition is one of the different symbioses that occur in nature. The competing organisms may be between the same or different species.

Competition may be intraspecific or interspecific. Interspecific competition is a form of competition between different species of the same ecological area. An example of interspecific competition is between lions and tigers that vie for similar prey. Another example is a farm of rice paddies with weeds growing in the field. Nevertheless, interspecific competition is generally less intense than intraspecific competition, which is a form of competition between the same species. That is because different species would tend to have different requirements for reproduction and growth. In contrast, same species compete for the same resource requirements.

Interspecific competition is capable of altering populations or communities in a particular ecological area. One species may be favoured over the other that vies for the same limited resource.


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