1. To breathe into; to fill with the breath; to animate. When Zephirus eek, with his sweete breath, Inspired hath in every holt and health The tender crops. (Chaucer) Descend, ye nine, descend and sing, The breathing instruments inspire. (Pope)

2. To infuse by breathing, or as if by breathing. He knew not his Maker, and him that inspired into him an active soul. (Wisdom xv. 11)

3. To draw in by the operation of breathing; to inhale; opposed to expire. Forced to inspire and expire the air with difficulty. (Harvey)

4. To infuse into the mind; to communicate to the spirit; to convey, as by a divine or supernatural influence; to disclose preternaturally; to produce in, as by inspiration. And generous stout courage did inspire. (Spenser) But dawning day new comfort hath inspired. (Shak)

5. To infuse into; to affect, as with a superior or supernatural influence; to fill with what animates, enlivens, or exalts; to communicate inspiration to; as, to inspire a child with sentiments of virtue. Erato, thy poet's mind inspire, And fill his soul with thy celestial fire. (Dryden)

Origin: oe. Enspiren, OF. Enspirer, inspirer, f. Inspirer, fr. L. Inspirare; pref. In- in _ spirare to breathe. See spirit.

1. To draw in breath; to inhale air into the lungs; opposed to expire.

2. To breathe; to blow gently. And when the wind amongst 40d

them did inspire, They waved like a penon wide dispread. (Spenser)

Origin: Inspired; Inspiring.

Retrieved from ""
First | Previous (Inspired gas) | Next (Inspirometer) | Last
Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page.