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Ink

Ink

1. A fluid, or a viscous material or preparation of various kinds (commonly black or coloured), used in writing or printing. Make there a prick with ink. (Chaucer) Deformed monsters, foul and black as ink. (Spenser)

2. A pigment. See india ink, under india.

Ordinarily, black ink is made from nutgalls and a solution of some salt of iron, and consists essentially of a tannate or gallate of iron; sometimes indigo sulphate, or other colouring matter,is added. Other black inks contain potassium chromate, and extract of logwood, salts of vanadium, etc. Blue ink is usually a solution of prussian blue. Red ink was formerly made from carmine (cochineal), brazil wood, etc, but potassium eosin is now used. Also red, blue, violet, and yellow inks are largely made from aniline dyes. Indelible ink is usually a weak solution of silver nitrate, but carbon in the form of lampblack or india ink, salts of molybdenum, vanadium, etc, are also used. Sympathetic inks may be made of milk, salts of cobalt, etc. See sympathetic ink (below). Copying ink, a peculiar ink used for writings of which copies by impression are to be taken.

(Science: zoology) ink bag, an ink sac. Ink berry.

(Science: botany) An organ, found in most cephalopods, containing an inky fluid which can be ejected from a duct opening at the base of the siphon. The fluid serves to cloud the water, and enable these animals to escape from their enemies. Sympathetic ink, a writing fluid of such a nature that what is written remains invisible till the action of a reagent on the characters makes it visible.

Origin: oe. Enke, inke, OF. Enque, f. Encre, L. Encaustum the purple red ink with which the roman emperors signed their edicts, gr, fr. Burnt in, encaustic, fr. To burn in. See Encaustic, caustic.


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Re: Blue Blood For A Science Project

... blue blood. Not very good start for a scientific project. So, unless you find some princess or snail, you will not get blue blood (unless you drop ink into it;).

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by JackBean
Wed Sep 26, 2012 6:35 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Blue Blood For A Science Project
Replies: 13
Views: 4426

Re: Printers

There has been some research activity using ink-jet printers to deposit biological and biomimetic materials, for instance as tissue engineering scaffolding. It is a nice controllable method for laying down a 2-D matrix in a particular pattern, ...

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by jonmoulton
Fri Apr 30, 2010 3:22 pm
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Printers
Replies: 6
Views: 2747

Printers

OK, then why should have biologists special forum about ink jet printers?

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by JackBean
Fri Apr 30, 2010 11:33 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Printers
Replies: 6
Views: 2747

Printers

Yes, like the normal ink jet printer you may have at home.

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by AlexanderB
Fri Apr 30, 2010 11:29 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Printers
Replies: 6
Views: 2747

Printers

Dear Users of biology-online! I have an important request: Some time ago ive read about the use of Ink jet printers in the field of biology, for example, tissue engineering. I took a look at the sites of some researchers and thought that it maybe a good idea to bring together ...

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by AlexanderB
Fri Apr 30, 2010 2:47 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Printers
Replies: 6
Views: 2747
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