Infectious canine hepatitis

Definition

noun

A viral hepatitis in dogs characterized by fever, depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, bloody diarrhoea, petechial haemorrhages in the gums, pale mucous membranes, and jaundice, and is caused by canine adenovirus 1


Supplement

The hepatitis is a condition characterized by the inflammation of the liver. Infectious canine hepatitis is a form of hepatitis affecting dogs. It is caused by a virus, particularly canine adenovirus 1. The virus belongs to the taxonomic family, Adenoviridae. It can be spread by via feces, saliva, urine, blood, saliva, and nasal discharge. It can be contracted through the mouth or nose and replicates in the tonsils. It then infects the liver and the kidneys of the dog.

The incubation period is four to seven days. The disease is characterized by fever, depression, loss of appetite, vomiting, bloody diarrhoea, petechial haemorrhages in the gums, pale mucous membranes, and jaundice. Most dogs recover from the disease and from possible kidney lesions and corneal edema. However, in other dogs, the condition may lead to a rather severe form characterized by bleeding disorders (e.g. hematomas in the mouth).

It is also called Rubarth's disease, which is named after Carl Sven Rubarth, a Swedish veterinarian, who described it in 1947.


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