Induces

Induce

1. To lead in; to introduce. The poet may be seen inducing his personages in the first Iliad. (Pope)

2. To draw on; to overspread.

3. To lead on; to influence; to prevail on; to incite; to move by persuasion or influence. He is not obliged by your offer to do it, . . . Though he may be induced, persuaded, prevailed upon, tempted. (Paley) Let not the covetous desire of growing rich induce you to ruin your reputation. (Dryden)

4. To bring on; to effect; to cause; as, a fever induced by fatigue or exposure. Sour things induces a contraction in the nerves. (Bacon)

5. (Science: physics) to produce, or cause, by proximity without contact or transmission, as a particular electric or magnetic condition in a body, by the approach of another body in an opposite electric or magnetic state.

6. (Science: logic) to generalise or conclude as an inference from all the particulars; the opposite of deduce.

Synonym: to move, instigate, urge, impel, incite, press, influence, actuate.

Origin: L. Inducere, inductum; pref. In- in _ ducere to lead. See duke, and cf. Induct.


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