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Humus

Humus

(Science: ecology) The part of dirt or soil which comes from organic matter, such as from dead and decaying plants and animal remains. Partially decomposed organic matter; the organic component of soil.Humus improves the fertility of soil because it is derived from biological material from dead organisms, therefore possesses many of the building blocks of life that can be harnessed by other living organisms such as plants locally occupying the soil.


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what are the common habitats of mosses?

... to basic ones. One doesn't only find mosses on damp places but also on sites which are very much exposed to sunshine and with basically no humus= water content, such as roofs of houses, etc.

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by SteveYst
Wed Oct 03, 2012 2:29 pm
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: what are the common habitats of mosses?
Replies: 4
Views: 3056

Re: Re:

... for this purpose) or small particules of clay... Soil with no organic matter in it (bacteria, fungi, earthworms, decomposing material, humus) is infertile. Most of the vegetables we eat wouldn't grow in it. The point is that "fertile ground" and "ground containing no ...

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by christianstrategies
Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:36 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Any SOLID arguments against evolution?
Replies: 309
Views: 498157

Re: Re:

... for this purpose) or small particules of clay... Soil with no organic matter in it (bacteria, fungi, earthworms, decomposing material, humus) is infertile. Most of the vegetables we eat wouldn't grow in it. The point is that "fertile ground" and "ground containing no ...

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by AstraSequi
Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:38 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Any SOLID arguments against evolution?
Replies: 309
Views: 498157

Limestone

I think the answer is to do do with acidity in the soil/earth which occurs sometimes. e.g. peat, or humus contain chemicals that stop the action of insects and bacteria, so in those circumstances the tree doesn't biodegrade. Mith Limestone CaCO3. Does contain carbon; but ...

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by tonyjeffs
Wed Feb 07, 2007 10:53 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: What part of a dead tree doesn't biodegrade
Replies: 9
Views: 5533

The Fiber Disease

... is nitrogen, and nitrogen in a compost heap, via the uses of naturally occurring organisms, convert s cellulose/carbon, to organic matter, i.e. humus. Long ago, as an intuitive thought, the term poly peptite reaction flew about my mind. Learn to recognize the voice of intuition; really it’s ...

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by Sabrina
Wed Jan 17, 2007 7:12 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: The Fiber Disease
Replies: 7403
Views: 4988352
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