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Heavy

Heavy

1. Heaved or lifted with labour; not light; weighty; ponderous; as, a heavy stone; hence, sometimes, large in extent, quantity, or effects; as, a heavy fall of rain or snow; a heavy failure; heavy business transactions, etc.; often implying strength; as, a heavy barrier; also, difficult to move; as, a heavy draught.

2. Not easy to bear; burdensome; oppressive; hard to endure or accomplish; hence, grievous, afflictive; as, heavy yokes, expenses, undertakings, trials, news, etc. The hand of the lord was heavy upon them of Ashdod. (1 sam. V. 6) The king himself hath a heavy reckoning to make. (Shak) Sent hither to impart the heavy news. (Wordsworth) Trust him not in matter of heavy consequence. (Shak)

3. Laden with that which is weighty; encumbered; burdened; bowed down, either with an actual burden, or with care, grief, pain, disappointment. The heavy [sorrowing] nobles all in council were. (Chapman) A light wife doth make a heavy husband. (Shak)

4. Slow; sluggish; inactive; or lifeless, dull, inanimate, stupid; as, a heavy gait, looks, manners, style, and the like; a heavy writer or book. Whilst the heavy plowman snores. (Shak) Of a heavy, dull, degenerate mind. (Dryden) Neither [is] his ear heavy, that it can not hear. (Is. Lix. 1)

5. Strong; violent; forcible; as, a heavy sea, storm, cannonade, and the like.

6. Loud; deep; said of sound; as, heavy thunder. But, hark! that heavy sound breaks in once more. (Byron)

7. Dark with clouds, or ready to rain; gloomy; said of the sky.

8. Impeding motion; cloggy; clayey; said of earth; as, a heavy road, soil, and the like.

9. Not raised or made light; as, heavy bread.

10. Not agreeable to, or suitable for, the stomach; not easily digested; said of food.

11. Having much body or strength; said of wines, or other liquors.

12. With child; pregnant. Heavy artillery.

(Science: chemistry) see metal. Heavy weight, in wrestling, boxing, etc, a term applied to the heaviest of the classes into which contestants are divided. Cf. Feather weight, under feather.

heavy is used in composition to form many words which need no special explanation; as, heavy-built, heavy-browed, heavy-gaited, etc.

Origin: oe. Hevi, as. Hefig, fr. Hebban to lift, heave; akin to OHG. Hebig, hevig, Icel. Hofigr, hofugr. See heave.


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by RZachary1
Wed Jan 14, 2015 5:49 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: immunoglobulins
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Views: 2181

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by saddy51
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Re: immunoglobulins

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by noncentric
Thu Oct 30, 2014 2:11 am
 
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Topic: immunoglobulins
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immunoglobulins

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