Haustorium

Definition

noun, plural: haustoria

(botany) Knob-like root for penetrating into and absorbing nutrients and water from the host plant

(mycology) A hyphal projection from a cell or tissue of a fungus that absorb nutrients and water


Supplement

In certain parasitic angiosperms, haustorium refers to the knob-like root structure that is used to penetrate into the host plant. It serves as a feeding organ for absorbing nutrients and water from the host plant. It may be regarded as an adventitious root or a type of an aerial root that grows into the tissues of a host plant. They are also referred to as sucking roots. It penetrates the cell wall of the host plant and then draw nourishment from the space in between the cell wall and plasma membrane.1 This is exemplified by the haustorial roots of mistletoe.

In fungal species, the haustarium is a projection from a cell or tissue of a fungus that absorb nutrients and water. It is a hyphal projection that penetrates into the cytoplasm of a host plant cell.


Word origin: Latin haustor ‎(“drain, drink or suck”) +‎ -ium

Synonym(s):

See also:

Related form(s):


Reference(s):
1Szabo, L. (July 3, 2001). "Hidden robbers: The role of fungal haustoria in parasitism of plants". PNAS. 98 (14): 7654–7655.

Retrieved from "http://www.biology-online.org/bodict/index.php?title=Haustorium&oldid=102320"
First | Previous (Haustorial root) | Next (Haversian canal) | Last
Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page.