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Harrow

Harrow

1. To draw a harrow over, as for the purpose of breaking clods and leveling the surface, or for covering seed; as, to harrow land. Will he harrow the valleys after thee? (job xxxix. 10)

2. To break or tear, as with a harrow; to wound; to lacerate; to torment or distress; to vex. My aged muscles harrowed up with whips. (Rowe) I could a tale unfold, whose lightest word Would harrow up thy soul. (Shak)

Origin: oe. Harowen, harwen; cf. Dan. Harve. See harrow.

1. An implement of agriculture, usually formed of pieces of timber or metal crossing each other, and set with iron or wooden teeth. It is drawn over plowed land to level it and break the clods, to stir the soil and make it fine, or to cover seed when sown.

2. An obstacle formed by turning an ordinary harrow upside down, the frame being buried. Bush harrow, a kind of light harrow made of bushes, for harrowing grass lands and covering seeds, or to finish the work of a toothed harrow. Drill harrow. See 6th drill. Under the harrow, subjected to actual torture with a toothed instrument, or to great affliction or oppression.

Origin: oe. Harowe, harwe, as. Hearge; cf. D. Hark rake, g. Harke, Icel. Herfi harrow, dan. Harve, Sw. Harf.


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