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Haploid

Definition

(Science: Cell Biology, Genetics)

noun

(1) The number of chromosomes in a gamete of an organism, symbolized by n.

(2) A cell or an organism having half of the number of chromosomes in somatic cells.


adjective

Of or pertaining to a condition in which there is only half of the complete set of chromosomes in somatic cells.


Supplement

For instance, a human germ cell (a sperm or an egg cell) is haploid, which means it contains only one of each of the 23 chromosomes of the human genome, or it only has half the diploid (2n) number of a human somatic cell (which is 46). Gametes being haploid are essential particularly during fertilization. The union of two sex cells, each with only haploid number of chromosomes, results in a diploid zygote. The integrity of chromosomal number throughout generations is eventually preserved.


Word origin: From Greek haplous, single.
Related forms:" haploidy (noun), haploidic (adjective).

Compare:" diploid, polyploid.

See also:" ploidy, monoploid, dihaploidy, polyhaploidy.


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Results from our forum


genetic

... a. What combination(s) of chromosomes are possible in daughter cells following mitosis? b. What combination(s) of chromosomes are possible in haploid cells following both divisions of meiosis? (Hint: remember independent assortment)

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by lachatausa
Fri Mar 21, 2014 2:55 am
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: genetic
Replies: 1
Views: 1663

Why can't sperm cells divide mitotically?

Sure it can and many haploid cells do. Just our sexual cells are not capable of it.

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by JackBean
Mon Mar 03, 2014 12:44 pm
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Why can't sperm cells divide mitotically?
Replies: 1
Views: 1002

Human Gamete Compatibility Going Backwards

... humans with other species was not and probably will never be tested. Your point on homology, however, may or may not be relevant. Theoretically, haploid genome should be sufficient to produce an organism as it contains full complement of genes. However, because some critical genes can be recessive, ...

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by Cat
Sat Jan 11, 2014 7:56 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Human Gamete Compatibility Going Backwards
Replies: 9
Views: 3945

I Need Help understanding gametes, genotypes and phenotypes

no, gametes are haploid, so it can be either E or e

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by JackBean
Mon Nov 11, 2013 11:36 am
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: I Need Help understanding gametes, genotypes and phenotypes
Replies: 5
Views: 3770

Year 11 Meiosis helpp!!!

... both diploid cells. From these 2 daughter cells the chromatids are pulled apart and then cell divison occurs once more producing 4 daughter cells (haploid cells) all with different genetic information. But I don't understand how the 4 daughter cells are all different as it seems 2 should be the ...

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by JenL97
Wed Oct 16, 2013 7:00 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Year 11 Meiosis helpp!!!
Replies: 3
Views: 2585
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