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Gauge

Gauge

1. A measure; a standard of measure; an instrument to determine dimensions, distance, or capacity; a standard. This plate must be a gauge to file your worm and groove to equal breadth by. (Moxon) There is not in our hands any fixed gauge of minds. (i. Taylor)

2. Measure; dimensions; estimate. The gauge and dimensions of misery, depression, and contempt. (Burke)

3. (Science: machinery) Any instrument for ascertaining or regulating the dimensions or forms of things; a templet or template; as, a button maker's gauge. To measure the dimensions of, or to test the accuracy of the form of, as of a part of a gunlock. The vanes nicely gauged on each side. (Derham)

4. (Science: physics) Any instrument or apparatus for measuring the state of a phenomenon, or for ascertaining its numerical elements at any moment; usually applied to some particular instrument; as, a rain gauge; a steam gauge.

5. Relative positions of two or more vessels with reference to the wind; as, a vessel has the weather gauge of another when on the windward side of it, and the lee gauge when on the lee side of it. The depth to which a vessel sinks in the water.

6. The distance between the rails of a railway. The standard gauge of railroads in most countries is four feet, eight and one half inches. Wide, or broad, gauge, in the united states, is six feet; in England, seven feet, and generally any gauge exceeding standard gauge. Any gauge less than standard gauge is now called narrow gauge. It varies from two feet to three feet six inches.

7. The quantity of plaster of paris used with common plaster to accelerate its setting.

8. To measure the capacity, character, or ability of; to estimate; to judge of. You shall not gauge me By what we do to-night. (Shak)

9. That part of a shingle, slate, or tile, which is exposed to the weather, when laid; also, one course of such shingles, slates, or tiles.

gauge of a carriage, car, etc, the distance between the wheels; ordinarily called the track. Gauge cock, a stop cock used as a try cock for ascertaining the height of the water level in a steam boiler. Gauge concussion, an instrument for measuring the diameter of the bore of a cannon at any point of its length. Steam gauge, an instrument for measuring the pressure of steam, as in a boiler. Tide gauge, an instrument for determining the height of the tides. Vacuum gauge, a species of barometer for determining the relative elasticities of the vapor in the condenser of a steam engine and the air. Water gauge. A contrivance for indicating the height of a water surface, as in a steam boiler; as by a gauge cock or glass. The height of the water in the boiler. Wind gauge, an instrument for measuring the force of the wind on any given surface; an anemometer. Wire gauge, a gauge for determining the diameter of wire or the thickness of sheet metal; also, a standard of size.

Origin: Written also gage.


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Re: Why do Africans have large noses and lips?

... had to pinch their noses for 2 minutes and were interviewed to discuss the way they felt after. (FYI I did not have any experimental devices to gauge sound or measure air intake) The results for the first test, the experimental condition was voices changed dramatically and sounded more nauseated ...

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by shannat
Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:52 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Why do Africans have large noses and lips?
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Is this a wolf??

Yeah, coyotes' range is almost the entirety of N America. And how does one gauge the size with no real benchmarks in the photos? It is a little bulky for a coyote. Stray/ feral dog is the best guess here.

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by Darby
Fri Dec 13, 2013 3:22 pm
 
Forum: Zoology Discussion
Topic: Is this a wolf??
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Views: 2201

Too many ions inside a neuron cell. What happens?

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by Coelacanth
Tue Dec 03, 2013 1:34 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Too many ions inside a neuron cell. What happens?
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Re:

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by teju85
Wed Nov 13, 2013 11:00 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Can Systolic BP ever be less than Diastolic?
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Views: 4761

Can Systolic BP ever be less than Diastolic?

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by Darby
Mon Oct 14, 2013 10:34 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Can Systolic BP ever be less than Diastolic?
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