Dictionary » G » Gas

Gas

Gas

Origin: Invented by the chemist van Helmont of brussels, who died in 1644.

1. An aeriform fluid; a term used at first by chemists as synonymous with air, but since restricted to fluids supposed to be permanently elastic, as oxygen, hydrogen, etc, in distinction from vapors, as steam, which become liquid on a reduction of temperature. in present usage, since all of the supposed permanent gases have been liquified by cold and pressure, the term has resumed nearly its original signification, and is applied to any substance in the elastic or aeriform state.

2. a complex mixture of gases, of which the most important constituents are marsh gas, olefiant gas, and hydrogen, artificially produced by the destructive distillation of gas coal, or sometimes of peat, wood, oil, resin, etc. It gives a brilliant light when burned, and is the common gas used for illuminating purposes. Laughing gas.

Any irrespirable aeriform fluid.

gas is often used adjectively or in combination; as, gas fitter or gasfitter; gas meter or gas-meter, etc.

(Science: chemistry) air gas, a kind of gas made by forcing air through some volatile hydrocarbon, as the lighter petroleums. The air is so saturated with combustible vapor as to be a convenient illuminating and heating agent.

(Science: physics) gas battery, a kind of 70c

gas made by forcing steam over glowing coals, whereby there results a mixture of hydrogen and carbon monoxide. this gives a gas of intense heating power, but destitute of light-giving properties, and which is charged by passing through some volatile hydrocarbon, as gasoline.

Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



Results from our forum


Re: Animal Intersections, Parallel Roads, Alternating Road Usage

Yes, I'm American. I was born in Oregon. If a solvent is made that can be put in SUV tanks that increases gas mileage, would that not be good? There are already millions of SUV's in operation. Now certainly it would also be a good idea to begin phasing out SUV's for better design ...

See entire post
by davidelkins777
Sun May 04, 2014 10:45 pm
 
Forum: Ecology
Topic: Animal Intersections, Parallel Roads, Alternating Road Usage
Replies: 3
Views: 690

Cardiostimulation with explosions in room

At the same time stimulate breathing. For example - HHO gas or flour. Is it possible?

See entire post
by enarees
Sat Apr 12, 2014 5:55 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Cardiostimulation with explosions in room
Replies: 0
Views: 373

Transpiration and Photosynthesis.

... sunlight, which will draw more up through the xylem from the roots. However more significantly for photosynthesis to take place there needs to be gas exchange through the stomatal pores predominantly found on the lower sides of the leaf. If these pores are closed very little water can evapourate ...

See entire post
by Babybel56
Fri Mar 14, 2014 4:07 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Transpiration and Photosynthesis.
Replies: 4
Views: 2480

Re: Would an asteroid simply just pass through Jupiter

... of jupiter. THe oters answered you correctly on the hydrogen part. I guess you could think of it liike water. When it is in its gas form there might be very little resistance so still som' as a liquid it offers more though an object more dense will sink right through it but in ...

See entire post
by vrc53
Sat Mar 08, 2014 7:00 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Would an asteroid simply just pass through Jupiter
Replies: 4
Views: 1703

Would an asteroid simply just pass through Jupiter

Whilst Jupiter is made of gas it is not a cloud as we think of them! It's atmosphere is mostly hydrogen, but there is such pressure exerted on it that as you descend towards the core it will form a liquid, and eventually even a metallic ...

See entire post
by Babybel56
Fri Feb 28, 2014 8:38 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Would an asteroid simply just pass through Jupiter
Replies: 4
Views: 1703
View all matching forum results

This page was last modified 09:19, 11 April 2007. This page has been accessed 8,077 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link