Endocrine system

Definition

noun

The bodily system consists of the endocrine glands, and is responsible for the production and secretion of hormones that aid in controlling the bodily metabolic activity, as well as serve as chemical messengers that allow cells to communicate with one another


Supplement

A biological or a bodily system is a group of entities that work together to carry out a particular task. In higher forms of organisms such as humans, the biological systems include integumentary system, lymphatic system, muscular system, nervous system, reproductive system , respiratory system, skeletal system, endocrine system, urinary system, and immune system.

The endocrine system is a biological system comprised of the endocrine glands. The endocrine glands may be contrasted to the exocrine glands (e.g. salivary glands and sweat glands), which also secrete hormones to the outside of the body. However, the exocrine glands make use of ducts. The endocrine glands are ductless glands and therefore do not require ducts to reach and affect target cells. The endocrine glands release their secretions (hormones) into the bloodstream to reach and act on specific cells of organs. These hormones aid in controlling the bodily metabolic activity, as well as serve as chemical messengers that allow cells to communicate with one another.

The major human endocrine glands include:


See also:

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