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Earthworms

Earthworm

1. (Science: zoology) Any worm of the genus lumbricus and allied genera, found in damp soil. One of the largest and most abundant species in Europe and America is L. Terrestris; many others are known; called also angleworm and dewworm.

2. A mean, sordid person; a niggard.


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Agriculture and Microbiology come together (Research Prjct)

... So it's not just good for the garden, good for the house and your pets in general. @EVERYONE Get some, and put them in your dirt, I am. You know earthworms are good right? These are like Micro-worms. I was just looking some other stuff up on amazon and I found Earthworms and Lady bugs. $6 for ...

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by Sophiahotep
Thu Nov 14, 2013 9:29 pm
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Agriculture and Microbiology come together (Research Prjct)
Replies: 2
Views: 3318

Re: aneuploidy and polyploidy

... for humans, and only normally observed in hermaphroditic animals and/or ones that undergo parthenogenesis like flatworms, shrimp, salamanders, earthworms... and that it is far more common in plants suggests that this condition has not been able to adapt to higher life forms and so, isn't as ...

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by carmodyf
Thu Oct 11, 2012 4:36 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: aneuploidy and polyploidy
Replies: 2
Views: 4355

What are the limits of genetic engineering

Genetic engineering works because there is one language of life: human genes work in bacteria, monkey genes work in mice and earthworms. Tree genes work in bananas and frog genes work in rice. There is no limit in theory to the potential of genetic engineering.

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by allenePanek
Wed Feb 22, 2012 7:43 am
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: What are the limits of genetic engineering
Replies: 9
Views: 5791

Re: Re:

... particules of fertile ground (disinfected, for this purpose) or small particules of clay... Soil with no organic matter in it (bacteria, fungi, earthworms, decomposing material, humus) is infertile. Most of the vegetables we eat wouldn't grow in it. The point is that "fertile ground" ...

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by christianstrategies
Wed Feb 08, 2012 7:36 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Any SOLID arguments against evolution?
Replies: 309
Views: 538956

Re: Re:

... particules of fertile ground (disinfected, for this purpose) or small particules of clay... Soil with no organic matter in it (bacteria, fungi, earthworms, decomposing material, humus) is infertile. Most of the vegetables we eat wouldn't grow in it. The point is that "fertile ground" ...

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by AstraSequi
Wed Feb 08, 2012 3:38 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Any SOLID arguments against evolution?
Replies: 309
Views: 538956
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