Dome

Dome

1. A building; a house; an edifice; used chiefly in poetry. Approach the dome, the social banquet share. (Pope)

2. A cupola formed on a large scale.

The Italians apply the term il duomo to the principal church of a city, and the germans call every cathedral church Dom; and it is supposed that the word in its present english sense has crept into use from the circumstance of such buildings being frequently surmounted by a cupola.

3. Any erection resembling the dome or cupola of a building; as the upper part of a furnace, the vertical steam chamber on the top of a boiler, etc.

4. (Science: chemistry) a prism formed by planes parallel to a lateral axis which meet above in a horizontal edge, like the roof of a house; also, one of the planes of such a form.

If the plane is parallel to the longer diagonal (macrodiagonal) of the prism, it is called a macrodome; if parallel to the shorter (brachydiagonal), it is a brachydome; if parallel to the inclined diagonal in a monoclinic crystal, it is called a clinodome; if parallel to the orthodiagonal axis, an orthodome.

Origin: f. Dome, It. Duomo, fr. L. Domus a house, domus Dei or Domini, house of the lord, house of God; akin to gr. House, to build, and E. Timber. See timber.


Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



This page was last modified on 3 October 2005, at 21:16. This page has been accessed 2,727 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link