Dishes

Dish

1. To put in a dish, ready for the table.

2. To make concave, or depress in the middle, like a dish; as, to dish a wheel by inclining the spokes.

3. To frustrate; to beat; to ruin. To dish out.

1. To serve out of a dish; to distribute in portions at table.

2. To hollow out, as a gutter in stone or wood. To dish up, to take (food) from the oven, pots, etc, and put in dishes to be served at table.

Origin: Dished; dishing.

1. A vessel, as a platter, a plate, a bowl, used for serving up food at the table. She brought forth butter in a lordly dish. (Judg. V. 25)

2. The food served in a dish; hence, any particular kind of food; as, a cold dish; a warm dish; a delicious dish. A dish fit for the gods. Home-home dishes that drive one from home. (Hood)

3. The state of being concave, or like a dish, or the degree of such concavity; as, the dish of a wheel.

4. A hollow place, as in a field.

5. (Science: chemical) a trough about 28 inches long, 4 deep, and 6 wide, in which ore is measured. That portion of the produce of a mine which is paid to the land owner or proprietor.

Origin: as. Disc, L. Discus dish, disc, quoit, fr. Gr. Quoit, fr. To throw. Cf. Dais, Desk, disc, discus.


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