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Dip

Dip

1. To plunge or immerse; especially, to put for a moment into a liquid; to insert into a fluid and withdraw again. The priest shall dip his finger in the blood. (Lev. Iv. 6) [Wat'ry fowl] now dip their pinions in the briny deep. (Pope) While the prime swallow dips his wing. (Tennyson)

2. To immerse for baptism; to baptize by immersion.

3. To wet, as if by immersing; to moisten. A cold shuddering dew Dips me all o'er. (Milton)

4. To plunge or engage thoroughly in any affair. He was . . . Dipt in the rebellion of the Commons. (Dryden)

5. To take out, by dipping a dipper, ladle, or other receptacle, into a fluid and removing a part; often with out; as, to dip water from a boiler; to dip out water.

6. To engage as a pledge; to mortgage. Live on the use and never dip thy lands. (Dryden) Dipped candle, a candle made by repeatedly dipping a wick in melted tallow. To dip snuff, to take snuff by rubbing it on the gums and teeth. To dip the colours, to lower the colours and return them to place; a form of naval salute.

Origin: oe. Dippen, duppen, as. Dyppan; akin to dan. Dyppe, Sw. Doppa, and to as. Dpan to baptize, os. Dpian, D. Doopen, g. Taufen, Sw. Dopa, goth. Daupjan, lith. Dubus deep, hollow, OSlav. Dupl hollow, and to E. Dive. Cf. Deep, Dive.

1. The action of dipping or plunging for a moment into a liquid. The dip of oars in unison.

2. Inclination downward; direction below a horizontal line; slope; pitch.

3. A liquid, as a sauce or gravy, served at table with a ladle or spoon.

4. A dipped candle.

(Science: medicine) dip of the horizon, its greatest angle of inclination to the horizon, or that of a line perpendicular to its direction or strike; called also the pitch.


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