Dictionary » D » Dim

Dim

Dim

1. Not bright or distinct; wanting luminousness or clearness; obscure in luster or sound; dusky; darkish; obscure; indistinct; overcast; tarnished. The dim magnificence of poetry. (Whewell) How is the gold become dim! (Lam. Iv. 1) I never saw The heavens so dim by day. (Shak) Three sleepless nights i passed in sounding on, through words and things, a dim and perilous way. (Wordsworth)

2. Of obscure vision; not seeing clearly; hence, dull of apprehension; of weak perception; obtuse. Mine eye also is dim by reason of sorrow. (job xvii. 7) The understanding is dim. (Rogers)

Obvious compounds: dim-eyed; dim-sighted, etc.

Synonym: obscure, dusky, dark, mysterious, imperfect, dull, sullied, tarnished.

Origin: as. Dim; akin to OFries. Dim, Icel. Dimmr: cf. MHG. Timmer, timber; of uncertain origin.

1. To render dim, obscure, or dark; to make less bright or distinct; to take away the luster of; to darken; to dull; to obscure; to eclipse. A king among his courtiers, who dims all his attendants. (Dryden) Now set the sun, and twilight dimmed the ways. (Cowper)

2. To deprive of distinct vision; to hinder from seeing clearly, either by dazzling or clouding the eyes; to darken the senses or understanding of. Her starry eyes were dimmed with streaming tears. (c. Pitt)

Origin: Dimmed; Dimming.


Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



This page was last modified 21:16, 3 October 2005. This page has been accessed 3,277 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link