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Dialect

Dialect

1. Means or mode of expressing thoughts; language; tongue; form of speech. This book is writ in such a dialect as may the minds of listless men affect. Bunyan. The universal dialect of the world. (South)

2. The form of speech of a limited region or people, as distinguished from ether forms nearly related to it; a variety or subdivision of a language; speech characterised by local peculiarities or specific circumstances; as, the ionic and attic were dialects of Greece; the Yorkshire dialect; the dialect of the learned. In the midst of this Babel of dialects there suddenly appeared a standard english language. (Earle) [Charles V] could address his subjects from every quarter in their native dialect. (Prescott)

Synonym: language, idiom, tongue, speech, phraseology. See language, and idiom.

Origin: f. Dialecte, L. Dialectus, fr. Gr, fr. To converse, discourse. See Dialogue.


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by Hellsinggareeg
Mon Aug 04, 2014 6:39 am
 
Forum: Microbiology
Topic: Detect influenza in saliva
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Views: 1909

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by Heordwfbfda
Sun Jul 13, 2014 10:00 am
 
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The origins of Man

... After the US purchased Louisiana, the Americans referred to les acadiens as Cajuns. I was raised in the Cajun culture, learning Cajun French (a dialect still heavily based on 18th century French) before I learned to speak English. Today, the Cajun culture is rapidly disappearing as young Cajuns ...

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by alextemplet
Thu Sep 27, 2007 6:38 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: The origins of Man
Replies: 68
Views: 40026

The origins of Man

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by MichaelXY
Sun Sep 16, 2007 8:00 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: The origins of Man
Replies: 68
Views: 40026


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