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Decomposition

Decomposition

1. The act or process of resolving the constituent parts of a compound body or substance into its elementary parts; separation into constituent part; analysis; the decay or dissolution consequent on the removal or alteration of some of the ingredients of a compound; disintegration; as, the decomposition of wood, rocks, etc.

2. The state of being reduced into original elements.

3. Repeated composition; a combination of compounds. Decomposition of forces. Same as resolution of forces, under resolution. Decomposition of light, the division of light into the prismatic colours.

Origin: Pref. De- (in sense 3 intensive) _ composition: cf. F. Decomposition. Cf. Decomposition. In a decomposed state.(chemistry) separation of a substance into two or more substances that may differ from each other and from the original substance.(biology) decaying caused by bacterial or fungal action.The organic phenomenon of rotting.The breaking down of a material into a less complicated chemical structure.


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Are Evergreens better for reducing carbon?

... its way back into the atmosphere through respiration. Leaves are generally poor long term sinks of carbon as they have relatively quick rates of decomposition when compared to wood. Although there is significant differences in the decomposition rates of leaves from different species, I don't ...

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by BasicBiology
Mon Aug 18, 2014 10:47 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Are Evergreens better for reducing carbon?
Replies: 2
Views: 953

biology

which process removes carbon dioxide out of the atmosphere? a) combustion b) decomposition c) photosynthesis d) respiration

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by geanna
Mon Mar 24, 2014 11:02 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: biology
Replies: 1
Views: 1395

Molecular gene (genome) concept scientifically untenable

... should restore the life of the organism. Further the body starts decaying immediately after death. What makes the body resistant to microbial decomposition and susceptible to decay when the material body is identical prior to and after death is also unexplainable. Clearly the genetic program ...

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by PAWahid
Wed May 02, 2012 4:54 am
 
Forum: Molecular Biology
Topic: Molecular gene (genome) concept scientifically untenable
Replies: 12
Views: 28991

Re: Re:

... when we die, we become dust, fertile ground... That also is contradictory. If land is fertile, it contains huge amounts of bacteria. Similarly, decomposition to "become fertile ground" does not happen without huge amounts of bacteria. That is to say, "inorganic matter" and ...

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by christianstrategies
Tue Feb 07, 2012 4:47 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Any SOLID arguments against evolution?
Replies: 309
Views: 544178

Re: Re:

... when we die, we become dust, fertile ground... That also is contradictory. If land is fertile, it contains huge amounts of bacteria. Similarly, decomposition to "become fertile ground" does not happen without huge amounts of bacteria. That is to say, "inorganic matter" and ...

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by AstraSequi
Mon Feb 06, 2012 9:08 pm
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Any SOLID arguments against evolution?
Replies: 309
Views: 544178
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