Dictionary » C » Cytokine

Cytokine

Definition

noun, plural: cytokines

Any of a group of proteins, peptides, or glycoproteins secreted by cells of the immune system, and act as regulators of cells involved in the generation of immune response


Supplement

Examples of cytokines are erythropoietin, interferon, interleukins, and G-CSF.


Word origin: Greek cyto (cell) + kinos (movement)


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Bio Research Paper Writing

... wanted an intro for every paragraph that is currently in my paper). I'm confused because why the heck would I need to write an explanation on how cytokines work or what is beta amyloid in a college research paper. I guess what I'm trying to say is, in a research paper, do I need to tangent off ...

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by NathanielZhu
Thu Apr 04, 2013 2:25 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Bio Research Paper Writing
Replies: 1
Views: 7992

Re: Cytokine - Receptor concepts

As for my suggestion, you can do some biological experiments to determine the localization and distribution of your interested receptors with purchased specifc antibodies. For example, immunohistochemistry is a useful rechnique. To get a reference, you can visit http://www.immunohistochemistry.us/

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by sunhan1985
Fri Dec 21, 2012 2:27 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Cytokine - Receptor concepts
Replies: 7
Views: 13169

Immunology: Th1/Th2 vs cellular/humoral responses

Th1/Th2 division is mainly based on the cytokines they produce and they do not exclusively help just one certain cell type. Th1 cells produce cytokines (such as IFN-g) that generally promote cell-mediated immunity, including CD8+ T cells and ...

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by biohazard
Thu Sep 08, 2011 10:00 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Immunology: Th1/Th2 vs cellular/humoral responses
Replies: 10
Views: 39147

Re: Cytokine - Receptor concepts

... remember!) *As I understand it, T cells are all or nothing when it comes to IL signalling, which means they don't usually have two conflicting cytokine signals while being in an 'undecided' state. In other words, they usually receive a signal from one IL receptor, and they go down that pathway ...

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by Nataly56
Thu Jul 14, 2011 7:47 am
 
Forum: Cell Biology
Topic: Cytokine - Receptor concepts
Replies: 7
Views: 13169

Re: Re:

... as well: people with atopy seem to have more of the low-affinity, allergen-specific T cells than healthy people. The TCR affinity also affects the cytokine production of the T cells, and the loose TCR binding of allergens seems to favour the IgE production of B cells that leads to allergic symptoms. ...

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by biohazard
Wed Jun 29, 2011 6:43 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: How does negative selection in the thymus get around viral a
Replies: 3
Views: 5483
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