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Butterflies

Butterflies

Slender-bodies diurnal insects having large, broad wings often strikingly coloured and patterned.


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A different approach to study entomology

... observe every species in their natural habitat, and understand more about their biology, interactions, and their behaviour. For example, of the butterflies of the genus Morpho it's known every details of the wing's structure, but it's not well known their biology and behaviour. So I want to ...

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by Myrmecia
Thu Aug 16, 2012 7:51 am
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: A different approach to study entomology
Replies: 4
Views: 3475

Succession

... to disappear. On the other hand, the loss of live trees is much less marked, and it affects minimally species living from them. The exception are butterflies that are feeding on leaves, not off the wood itself (unlike beetles), and hence are not affected by the disappearance of dead trees.

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by canalon
Fri Dec 02, 2011 8:42 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Succession
Replies: 6
Views: 3478

Re: Succession

... removed; a lot of beetles on dead trees endangered cf live trees; dead trees a habitat for more species, so more affected; by loss of dead trees; butterflies do not feed on dead trees; so not affected. How is it relevant to quesion 3cii)

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by jsmith613
Thu Dec 01, 2011 6:39 pm
 
Forum: General Discussion
Topic: Succession
Replies: 6
Views: 3478

Year 12 exam help

... my final exam coming up and there is one particular question in a previous exam that has completely thrown me out. It talks about how birds and butterflies use wings to fly through the air and then asks what it is an example of a) Analogous Structures b) Homologous Structures c) Continuous Structures ...

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by Rose165
Fri Oct 28, 2011 2:44 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Year 12 exam help
Replies: 3
Views: 2074

Re:

... birds, seem to be almost universally no-so-scary, as well as some other animals that can easily be distinguished from all dangerous animals (say, butterflies). A modern human, as well as the early ancestor, could usually overcome their fears if they had to. A lone caveman would probably be very ...

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by biohazard
Mon Sep 12, 2011 6:07 am
 
Forum: Genetics
Topic: Is arachnophobia genetic?
Replies: 6
Views: 8926
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