Bureau

Bureau

Origin: f. Bureau a writing table, desk, office, OF, drugget, with which a writing table was often covered, equiv. To f. Bure, and fr. OF. Buire dark brown, the stuff being named from its colour, fr. L. Burrus red, fr. Gr. Flame-coloured, prob. Fr. Fire. See fire, and cf. Borel.

1. Originally, a desk or writing table with drawers for papers.

2. The place where such a bureau is used; an office where business requiring writing is transacted.

3. Hence: a department of public business requiring a force of clerks; the body of officials in a department who labour under the direction of a chief.

on the continent of Europe, the highest departments, in most countries, have the name of bureaux; as, the bureau of the minister of foreign Affairs. In England and America, the term is confined to inferior and subordinate departments; as, the Pension bureau, a subdepartment of the department of the interior. In spanish, bureo denotes a court of justice for the trial of persons belonging to the kings household.

4. A chest of drawers for clothes, especially when made as an ornamental piece of furniture. Bureau system. See Bureaucracy. Bureau Veritas, an institution, in the interest of maritime underwriters, for the survey and rating of vessels all over the world. It was founded in Belgium in 1828, removed to paris in 1830, and reestablished in brussels in 1870.


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