Dictionary » B » Breathing

Breathing

Breathing

1. Respiration; the act of inhaling and exhaling air. Subject to a difficulty of breathing. (Melmoth)

2. Air in gentle motion.

3. Any gentle influence or operation; inspiration; as, the breathings of the spirit.

4. Aspiration; secret prayer. Earnest desires and breathings after that blessed state.

5. Exercising; promotion of respiration. Here is a lady that wants breathing too; And i have heard, you knights of Tyre Are excellent in making ladies trip. (Shak)

6. Utterance; communication or publicity by words. I am sorry to give breathing to my purpose. (Shak)

7. Breathing place; vent.

8. Stop; pause; delay. You shake the head at so long a breathing. (Shak)

9. Also, in a wider sense, the sound caused by the friction of the outgoing breath in the throat, mouth, etc, when the glottis is wide open; aspiration; the sound expressed by the letter h.

10. A mark to indicate aspiration or its absence. See rough breathing, smooth breathing, below. Breathing place. A pause. That caesura, or breathing place, in the midst of the verse. . A vent. Breathing time, pause; relaxation. Breathing while, time sufficient for drawing breath; a short time. Rough breathing (spiritus asper) . See asper, smooth breathing (spiritus lenis), a mark (') indicating the absence of the sound of h, as in 'ienai (ienai).

Source: Websters 3b3

dictionary

Passing or able to pass air in and out of the lungs normally; sometimes used in combination; the boy was disappointed to find only skeletons instead of living breathing dinosaurs; the heavy-breathing person on the telephone.The bodily process of inhalation and exhalation; the process of taking in oxygen from inhaled air and releasing carbon dioxide by exhalation.Inspiration and expiration of air (for oxygen) in the lungs which allows gaseous exchange between the lungs and blood stream.


Please contribute to this project, if you have more information about this term feel free to edit this page



Results from our forum


Re: Why do Africans have large noses and lips?

... did not change. For the second test, during the semi structured interview, participants confirmed that their nasal airway was restricted and breathing from the nose was harder and rather uncomfortable, that they were forced to breath through their mouth. From this short experiment we can ...

See entire post
by shannat
Mon Jul 28, 2014 12:52 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Why do Africans have large noses and lips?
Replies: 31
Views: 213264

Cardiostimulation with explosions in room

At the same time stimulate breathing. For example - HHO gas or flour. Is it possible?

See entire post
by enarees
Sat Apr 12, 2014 5:55 pm
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Cardiostimulation with explosions in room
Replies: 0
Views: 437

Re:

... and milliseconds - anger, lust, fear, pleasure, entertainment and excitement are some examples. These emotions are associated with fast breathing and heart-rate, fast visual and verbal processing. These emotions don"t require gaps between thinking to evoke, intensify and sustain. ...

See entire post
by sushil_yadav
Sat Mar 08, 2014 4:20 am
 
Forum: Ecology
Topic: Industrial Society Destroys Mind and Environment
Replies: 45
Views: 46265

biology

John is a 72 year old Irish person currently living in the UK. He has had hypertension since his early 50s and has started to develop breathing difficulties following mild exercise. His cardiologist has made an appointment to perform a gated nuclear ventriculogram to assess Michael’s heart ...

See entire post
by zak
Wed Dec 18, 2013 11:20 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: biology
Replies: 8
Views: 3077

Is voluntary death from breath-holding possible?

... unconscious, does the following muscular relaxation result in respiritory arrest (and hence death from asphyxiation), or does one resume normal breathing?

See entire post
by Coelacanth
Tue Oct 15, 2013 8:25 am
 
Forum: Human Biology
Topic: Is voluntary death from breath-holding possible?
Replies: 1
Views: 995
View all matching forum results

This page was last modified 21:16, 3 October 2005. This page has been accessed 13,475 times. 
What links here | Related changes | Permanent link