A member of the B vitamins, found in raw egg yolk, liver, peanuts, leafy green vegetables, and is involved in gluconeogenesis and synthesis of fatty acids, isoleucine, and valine


B vitamins are water-soluble vitamins. Biotin is one of the B vitamins; the others are vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin or nicotinic acid), vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine), vitamin B9 (folic acid), and vitamin B12 (cobalamins). Another name for biotin is vitamin H. It is also referred to as vitamin B7. This vitamin contains ureido ring attached to a tetrahydrothiophene ring. It is also called as coenzyme R. It functions as a coenzyme of the following carboxylases: (1) acetyl CoA carboxylase during the synthesis of fatty acids from acetate, (2) propionyl CoA carboxylase for gluconeogenesis, (3) pyruvate CoA carboxylase during the metabolism of energy, amino acids and cholesterol, and (4) beta-methylcrotonyl CoA carboxylase for leucine metabolism. Biotin can be obtained from raw egg yolk, liver, peanuts, and leafy green vegetables.

IUPAC name: 5-[(3aS,4S,6aR)-2-oxohexahydro-1H-thieno[3,4-d]imidazol-4-yl]pentanoic acid

Chemical formula: C10H16N2O3S

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