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Bark

Bark

The outermost covering of trees and some plants. This is composed of the cuticle or epidermis, the outer bark (cortex), and the inner bark or fibre.


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Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

@Babybel56: *living cells yeah, the phloem is basically part of the bark, so whenever you damage the bark down to the wood, you're destroing also the phloem. However, phloem doesn't transport nutrients (and it definitely doesn't transport glucose) from leaves ...

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by JackBean
Fri Feb 28, 2014 3:15 pm
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 1611

Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

... to create the dead heartwood at the centre of the trees. This means the phloem are always on the outside the trunk, just beneath the periderm (bark). If you take off the bark, you are likely to damage the phloem as well. The phloem transport glucose from where it is produced (the leaves) to ...

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by Babybel56
Fri Feb 28, 2014 9:27 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 1611

Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?

Hello. Recently my teacher said that if the plant's bark somehow gets ruined, the plant will eventually die. She said that the floem gets damaged and therefore the glucose cannot be transported to the roots. My problem is that I do not really understand ...

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by finalfantasy
Fri Jan 31, 2014 3:59 pm
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Why does the floem gets affected when the bark gets damaged?
Replies: 2
Views: 1611

Cottonwood tree twigs with star-shaped pattern

... diameter are cut in cross section at a "joint" (where the twig is slightly swollen and growth rings appear to circle the twig's bark), I sometimes find a perfect little star--other times I don't. And in twigs that have dried to the point of brittleness that feature is not visible. ...

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by Thos
Sun Aug 19, 2012 2:54 am
 
Forum: Botany Discussion
Topic: Cottonwood tree twigs with star-shaped pattern
Replies: 0
Views: 2046

Re: Why is knowledge on phylogeny important

... plant species Taxus brevifolia. This species produces a compound, taxol, which is useful for treating cancer. Unfortunately, large quantities of bark from this rare tree are required to produce enough taxol for a single patient. Through cladistic analysis, a phylogeny for the genus Taxus has ...

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by Lucanus cervus
Tue Jun 05, 2012 12:25 am
 
Forum: Evolution
Topic: Why is knowledge on phylogeny important
Replies: 4
Views: 7878
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