B vitamins

Definition

noun

A group of water-soluble vitamins, particularly vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin or nicotinic acid), vitamin B5 (pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine), vitamin B7 (biotin), vitamin B9 (folic acid), and vitamin B12 (cobalamins)


Supplement

Vitamins are essential for normal growth and metabolism. They are not readily produced in sufficient amounts and therefore must be obtained from diet or by supplement. In humans, there are 13 vitamins recommended for daily intake. Of these 13 vitamins, nine of them are water-soluble and the rest is fat-soluble. All eight B vitamins together with vitamin C are water-soluble vitamins. This means that they dissolve in water more easily and are eliminated from the body more readily than fat soluble vitamins. These eight B vitamins are vitamin B1 (thiamine), vitamin B2 (riboflavin), vitamin B3 (niacin or nicotinic acid), vitamin B5 (Pantothenic acid), vitamin B6 (pyridoxine, pyridoxal, pyridoxamine), vitamin B7 (biotin), vitamin B9 (folic acid), and vitamin B12 (cobalamins). They may function as coenzymes or cofactors that participate in many metabolic processes, e.g. generation of energy from carbohydrates, energy production for the electron transport chain, energy transfer reactions in the metabolism of glucose, fat and alcohol, oxidation of fatty acids and carbohydrates, amino acid metabolism, metabolism of lipids, proteins and carbohydrates, transfer of single-carbon units in the metabolism of nucleic acids and amino acids, etc. Food rich in B vitamins are fish, poultry, meat, eggs, dairy products, leafy green vegetables, beans, peas, and many cereals.


See also:

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