Atrioventricular sulcus



(anatomy) A sulcus or a groove on the outer surface of the heart marking the division between the atria and the ventricles


The word sulcus is an anatomical term used to refer to any of the narrow grooves in an organ or tissue. Thus, the atrioventricular sulcus points to the sulcus separating the atria from the ventricles of the heart. Because of this, it is also sometimes called the coronary sulcus or coronary groove. This sulcus encircles the heart and contains the major horizontally directed vessels of the heart. The middle cardiac vein can be found in the posterior interventricular sulcus whereas the annulus fibrosis lies in a position at the coronary sulcus almost completely separating the atrial and ventricular muscles.1 The coronary sinus is also found on the coronary sinus, particularly on the posterior surface of the heart. The coronary sinus is the collection of veins that form the large vessel collecting blood from the myocardium.


See also:

1 Gest, T., Burkel, W. & Waanders, N. (1993). Review questions for gross anatomy & embryology. New York: Parthenon. Page 171.

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